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June 2021

Gorilla Kie is a self-made mover and shaker. Her best qualities as a mixologist, bartender, and entrepreneur are being creative, innovative, and motivated. According to Kie, you have to be innovative to be creative, and to be creative, you have to be innovative. One cannot exist without the other. This Gorilla Kie Mixology motto is the code that she lives by, and her creativity, innovation, and motivation allow her to turn everything she touches into gold. With her Midas Touch and signature gorilla moves, Gorilla Kie pays homage to her ambitious, artist self and her Haitian culture. Kie has also made a name for herself and set herself apart as one to watch as her charisma and charm catapult her to local stardom. Gorilla kie is currently a Bar Manager at Syndicate Wynwood where she also created a cocktail menu with her very own consulting company, Gorilla Kie Mixology.

Tell us your story and hospitality background. 

I’ve been in the hospitality industry for about seven or eight years. I’ve been bartending for about seven years. I have worked for corporate restaurants such as Darden. They have Bahama Breeze and Red Lobster- I’ve worked at both. I’ve also started doing creative cocktail making which is what people know me for today. I’ve only been doing it for about two years. I am self-taught. I never went to bartending school. I’ve taken a couple of classes online as far as certificates to better understand my craft. Everything, for me, is just an art of expression.  I like to say that I am a spirit serving the spirits to spirits. So my spirits need to be crafted and delegated in a manner in which people can respect, enjoy, and understand what it is that I do and why I do it. 

What inspired you to become a mixologist? What influences your mixology?

I have always had a great fascination with people throwing bottles in the air and then making beautiful art. I do not have anyone who I want to be like. If anything, I’m probably going to be the first of my kind. I am definitely paying homage to the people who have been in the industry for many years, especially the Blacks that traveled North to own their own restaurants and bars in the D.C. and Chicago area. Blacks were creating the Mint Julep, for example, which is huge for the Woodford Reserve Kentucky Derby these days. I definitely pay homage to things of that nature, however, when it comes to my craft, everything is inspired. I’m an artist. I’m a creator. I try to make the best out of anything and everything that I do. 

Gorilla Kie MixWhat are the key characteristics of being a successful mixologist? 

Anybody can be a mixologist. Once you taste something and you fall in love with it, you just start to create ideas. Anyone can do that. What makes me “Gorilla Kie,” what sets me apart from any and everybody else, is that I take it a step further. Mixology is one of my reasons to connect with humanity. These days people are on their phones. There isn’t a lot of social activity going on between one human and the next. When people come to my bar, or when I go to people for private events, it is a perfect opportunity to be able to talk to people. It’s a perfect opportunity to be able to say, “Hey, how are you doing?” It’s great to have a conversation with people for people to open up. Spirits can be a really good thing or a really bad thing. A lot of people like to call it the Devil’s Juice, but I like to call it Gorilla Kie’s Juice because it is a therapeutic, medicinal method. 

How do you differ from other mixologists?

I give a beautiful experience to people. I try to change people’s perspective and understanding of what it means to come to a bar. For me, as a woman, a person of color, and the L in the LGBT, I want to be able to change perspectives. I am the minority in this industry so I want to leave a positive imprint for people. Most importantly, I want people to take a positive message when they leave my bar: they may come in one way, but they will leave another (happy). That is the most fulfilling aspect when it comes to this craft.  It’s not just cocktail making. It’s getting to know people. It’s getting to love people. It’s getting to build those relationships that can last a lifetime!

Is there any advice you would impart to individuals who don’t see themselves in the industry but who may want to be a part of it?

What I would say to people who want to be in this industry, who happen to identify as a minority in any way, is to understand what it is that they love and if they can see themselves doing it every day.  One of the ways to be able to do that is to practice that craft and ask yourself if you’ve become exhausted or tired of it. That is not necessarily to be misconstrued with being burned out because anybody can be burned out with something they love. Everything in moderation. If you don’t feel like it is something you can do on an everyday basis, then it is not your passion. But if it is, find creative ways to make it your best. Have conversations with fellow people about your line of work to see if it’s something you really want to do. Once you figure that out, maximize to your fullest potential.  No matter what color, creed or walk of life people are; ask and inquire about some knowledge to become the best at your craft. Not only will You find this most rewarding, but you will  further understand that this is a great way to becoming your best self. 

You are known as “Gorilla Kie”. What is the significance of the Gorilla?

Gorillas are my spirit animal. My mom is an American educator and my father is an immigrant from Haiti who became a Master Electrician and Contractor. I grew up in a strict household when it came to education and when it came to what my brother and I were fed on television. We couldn’t watch cable during the week. All we were left with was Bill Nye: The Science Guy, the Discovery Channel, etc. Within that process, I used to love watching documentaries about animals. I fell in love with gorillas. You know how they say that lions are the kings of the safari? Well, gorillas are the king of the jungle. I stay true to that. This industry is a jungle within itself so I am that gorilla. I am that king. I am a queen in every way, but I am a king as well. I believe that one and the other are a unit. They are still royalty. They are still top tier. I am an androgynous individual. Yes, I am female, but I have a lot of masculine qualities. I see myself as “king”. Loosely based on that, I put “Kie” for “Kierra” for short.  

2021 04 26 Woodford Reserve Chose FR 14019 EditedYou are also known for your signature Gorilla moves. Where did these moves originate?

My moves developed over time. A lot of people don’t know that I practiced Martial Arts when I was younger. Because of muscle memory, my foot movement carried over to my shaking methods. While shaking or when I scream, I’m literally calling on the ancestors. I am aiming to make sure that, before I give the cocktail, it is gifted with the spirit’s presence. That might be the Haitian in me. I move accordingly depending on what cocktail I’m making or who I’m talking to. It’s not choreographed. I just go with it. I am all about physics and alchemy. It is all a form of energy being put into that spirit. It has to be perfect. If it’s not perfect, it’s unconducive with me. That is the meaning behind ‘the shake’. 

On your IG you say, “I AM, THE Mixologist/Bartender who turns everything ‘TOUCHED’ into GOLD.” When did you learn that you had the Midas Touch and how has it impacted your professional and/or personal life?

I am a very powerful individual. I mean that in a spiritual and a courageous way. I am very confident in knowing that anything I do will be done to the best of my ability. Whether it’s a conversation, making a cocktail, or taking my lovely wife out to dinner, it is going to be a golden moment. Gold, other than diamond, is one of the most precious stones in this world. I am gold. I see myself as gold. I see myself as unbreakable. I am a stone of color. Gold is very powerful and so I want any and everything I do, touch, or say, to be impacted on that next individual equivalently. 

How would you describe Miami in three words? How would you describe the Mixology scene?

I was born and raised here in Miami. If I can describe Miami in three words I would say breeze, hot, and fine. That is Miami. When it comes to the Mixology scene, I’ll be honest, and say that we need a lot of work. I am well traveled when it comes to the Mixology scene in the United States. I don’t really know a scene here. I am not one who has been in the game for a long time compared to some individuals not living in Miami. There are ambitious professionals in the game of mixology. They go to different distilleries and learn how to become Master Blenders- hopefully one day.  I don’t see the same charisma down here in Miami. For me, personally, that is a challenge and I would really like to help change that. 

Discuss Gorilla Kie Mixology LLC. What are some of your services?

I have been asked to start a business for the longest time. I was thinking to myself, “How would I start a business?” I’m the last person in my family to become a business owner. I’m the first person in my family to be in this line of business. I wanted to monetize and maximize my business with what it is that I do. I started to create cocktails for pop up shows. I would pre-package them. I thought, number one, it’s a great way to network. Number two, it’s a great way to get your name out there. Number three, it’s a great way to find out what these Gorilla Kie cocktails are all about and also setting up a safe, creative space for people to come and see me outside of the bar. I can have more personal interactions with them. These were some of the incentives of starting a business. Another incentive was being able to be a cocktail consultant. One of my most recent projects, there is a new bar called Syndicate Wynwood, that is getting ready to open. I was responsible for creating one of their menus. That was a lot of fun so I was thinking that I could make some really good money off of creative cocktail making. I could have conversations and find out what people like. I try to meet those expectations which is something I do on an everyday basis. 80% of the cocktails that I make at my bar are for the first time. Why? Because when people come, I do not like to offer what’s on the menu. I like to talk to them. I like to find out their favorite spirit. I like to find out what kind of flavors and food they like. Then, I make a masterpiece cocktail off of that, right there. I also do freelance bartending at weddings, anniversaries, etc.  For pricing, people can go through my instagram.  

Are you able to discuss your upcoming Cocktail Bar Syndicate Wynwood Miami? If so, what was the process of pursuing this venture? How did you meet your business partner/ creator friend Andres Gill? What inspired you two to go into business together?

Andres Gill has an extensive resume when it comes to bars in Miami. He is very well known within our community. I was introduced to him by my cousin. Once he and my cousin got together, and she let him know who I was, the opportunity for Syndicate Wynwood was later extended to me. Being that over a period of time, I was able to say this is what I have been able to do and these are the pictures I’ve taken. I showed my charisma when it comes to creative cocktail making. When I make a cocktail, this is how intense it is for me and how serious I take it. I think that I was able to hit all the nails in the wall with one strike. That is why they reached out to me when it came to creating the menu. 

On your IG, you write that you are the woman with the hat that dreams. What is the significance of your hat? When did you start wearing it and how does it relate to your approach to your craft?

I started wearing hats on an everyday basis back when I met my wife. That was in 2015.  I have always been a lover of hats. On my mother’s side, who is American (her mom is from Mississippi), these southern women are always known for their extravagant looking hats that they wear when they go to church on Sundays. Even though I didn’t have any hats, I would always wear my grandma’s hats whenever I went to church with her. As far as my Haitian side, my grandfather is known for his fedoras with their feathers. He would have his Hennessy or his Barbancourt while he’s playing dominoes. I just think of the confidence. The way he walks. He is a man to be respected. He has always had this spirit on him. You walk differently when you wear your crown. My hair is my crown. My mind, most importantly, is my crown. I never leave the house without my hat because it is a reminder to carry my mind with me when I walk through the door. For me, that is the reason I take such pride when it comes to my hats. They’re an extension of me. I wear the hat. The hat does not wear me. It is personal. I wear these hats well because they are where my ways of life stem from. 

What is the best way to contact you?

Follow Gorilla Kie on IG @master_gorilla_kie, @go_kie_mix, and @thegorillakieshow

 

*All the images credits goes to @52chefs 

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Father’s day is less than 5 days now and you haven’t been able to buy a present for dad, we all been there. worry no more, here’s a list of fine liquor to celebrate. 

Stranahan’s Blue Peak

This year, shoppers can order bottles of Stranahan’s personalized with specialty engravings. Pick from Stranahan’s latest offering, including their new and improved Original expression, or Stranahan’s Blue Peak, perfect for sipping on the rocks or a strong cocktail.

Named for a 13-thousand-foot peak in Aspen, Blue Peak is built around a small batch of single malt whiskey that’s been aged for 4 years before being finished with the time-honored Solera process, typically seen in winemaking. Blue Peak is chill filtered, bottled at 43% ABV and available nationwide to purchase for $42.99 MSRP at fine retailers nationwide.

Stra

  • Nose: Dried apricot, nutmeg, cinnamon toast, hints of leather and light tobacco      

  • PalateCreamy butterscotch and brown sugar, baked apples, with notes of cayenne and toasted oak
  • FinishRich and mellow, earthy malt gently fades into lingering spices
  • ProofBlue Peak is bottled at 86 proof (43%ABV)
  • MSRP$42.99 for a 750ml bottle

Availablehttps://www.reservebar.com/products/stranahans-blue-peak-single-malt-whiskey

Barceló Imperial Onyx.

Black onyx stones absorb and transform negative energy and aid in the development of emotional, physical strength and stamina, especially during times of stress, uncertainty or grief. Bold like the name, this dark añejo blend of 10-year-old rums in heavily charred ex-bourbon barrel, is then filtered through onyx stones, which attribute the mysticism of this unique super-premium rumIt is best enjoyed straight-up or over ice so as to fully appreciate its remarkably robust and full-bodied taste. ($46) The elegant, matte bottle would make a great addition on the table!  

Bar Imperial*Barcelo Imperial Onyx was recently awarded a Double Gold Medal at the 2021 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. This is one of the highest honors for a spirit brand at one of the most prestigious spirts competitions in the world.*

  • Color: Amber Mahogany

  • Aroma: Caramel aroma with intriguing hint of violet
  • Taste: The silky palate opens with caramel and brown butter, accented by dried fig and walnut, finishing long and gently spiced; Finish: It is best enjoyed straight up or over ice to fully appreciate its robust taste!
Find Barceló at Total Wines, or order online through ReserveBar with Free Shipping using code: BARCELOSHIP

Bacardi ocho

 

 

BACARDI 8 years Aged Rum 

Inspired by a family recipe from 1862, BACARDÍ Reserva Ocho is known as The Family Reserve. After minimun of eight years of ageing, Bacardi Reserva Ocho releases delightful flavors of stone, fruits and spices.

Nose: Dried apricot and banana leaf

Palate: The palate is sweet and rich with tropical fruits, oak and spices, peels and winter spice

Finish: Expansive and well-rounded, gentle and luscious

Available at Drizly 

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The prestigious American Fine Wine Competition,  announced the result for The Invitational, which takes place annually in south Florida.  With the Pandemic wreaking havoc for the past year, the judging was delayed, and took place on Memorial Day Weekend.  More than 550 wines from 125 wineries vied for top honors at this INVITATION-only event. The Judging — conducted by a 28-member blue ribbon panel of wine industry educators, restaurateurs, retailers, journalists, and top sommeliers from across the country — was held at the Chaplin School of Hospitality & Tourism Management at Florida International University, Biscayne Bay Campus.

As usual, the results did not disappoint!  There were ties for Best of Show Red wine AND Best of Show Sparkling.  And the Sparkling wines were from the same winery!  Equally exciting, there was also a tie for Best of Class Riesling, which was the case last year as well. 

Co-founder and President Shari Gherman said, “At AFWC, we look for the very best wines the country has to offer, and so they must be vetted before being invited.  This year was challenging since the country was pretty much shut down.  But with some creativity, we persevered, and as one can see by the results, we found stunning wines yet again.”

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The Judges had an incredibly difficult time coming up with the Best of Class results.  Judge Wendy Rosano said, “Of the 11 double gold medal winning Red Bordeaux Blends, it was almost impossible to pick one!”  Judge Patrick Sullivan said, “The 12 Double Gold medal winning Syrah’s were so awesome, we actually finished drinking our glasses!”  In the Cabernet Sauvignon category, there were five flights where ALL the wines were awarded double gold medals.   

Fourteen years of careful scouting and judging means this competition starts where others end.  Four-team judging panels evaluate, describe, debate and assign medals and scores. “Our Judges take their time and really care about getting it right” observed Greg Miseyko, Chief Judge and Judging Coordinator.  Wines earn Gold, Silver or Bronze medals and “Double Gold” honors when every judge agrees the wine deserves a Gold Medal. Points from a 100-point scale are also awarded.  Miseyko added “We want to direct the public to America’s finest wines, to become the most trusted source of information about finding quality wines.” 

Remember, Price doesn’t always dictate the finest. Quality does.

Attached are the complete results.

AFWC 2021 Best Of final 06-09-21

They are also posted at www.AmericanFineWineCompetition.org

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Give the National Ambassador of Abasolo Whisky and Nixta Licor de Elote, Cesar Sandoval three adjectives, and he will make you an incredible drink. From cooking with his mom and two sisters to becoming a part of the hospitality industry at fifteen, Sandoval has always loved leaving people grateful, happy, and excited for an unforgettable experience. Sandoval, a first-generation Mexican, is no stranger to the power of serving one’s community. As a national ambassador, he continues to bring people a joyous product that thrives from its Mexican heritage and pays homage to its culture in flavor, aesthetic, and production. 

What drew you to the hospitality industry? 

I was born in El Paso, Texas. I am a first-generation Mexican American and currently live in San Diego. Hospitality started with my family. My mom, two sisters and I would be in the kitchen cooking different things together and listening to music. My first job was at a restaurant as a host.  I was fifteen years old, I started there and never looked back; I fell in love, it was addicting. From there, I worked my way up in almost every position in the industry, with the most recent position being bar director for a restaurant group. Hospitality is my passion! I love making cocktails, I love seeing the guests’ instant gratitude. It is beautiful! 

How did you get involved with Abasolo? 

Our Director of Advocacy and dear friend Camille Austin, reached out to me and asked if I was interested in creating a new project that would be revolutionary. We continued to stay in contact and while both of us kept doing our research it became evident that this new brand and myself were a perfect match. When I finally got the opportunity to try Abasolo for the first time, I decided to taste it blindly without looking at any bottle or label design, I sipped it and it instantly put a smile on my face, something I had never tasted in spirit form. The rich corn flavor and complexity was complete nostalgia, it took me back to those days in the kitchen with my mother making atole, tamales and fresh tortillas. It was fantastic!

Abasolo Ancestral Corn Whisky 5 Photo Credit Abasolo Ancestral Corn WhiskyWhat should we know about Abasolo Whisky? 

It’s truly a unique whisky unlike any other. It embodies the true flavor and expression of corn that has never been done before. It uses an ancestral cooking technique Nixtamalization which is how you convert maiz into masa. Without it we would not have beautiful dishes like tortillas, tamales, tlayudas and many more. It adds amazing flavors and aromas that you simply cannot get without it, and no other spirit has ever harnessed this process. We work with local family farmers that have been growing cacahuazintle for over 200 years. This is an ancestral corn that has been protected for thousands of years. We do a long fermentation process, double distil and age outdoors in the beautiful hills of Jilotepec de Abasolo. 

Would you say Nixta and Abasolo go together? What is the difference between Nixta and Abasolo? 

Abasolo is a new world whisky unlike any other, we use ancestral non-GMO cacahuazintle corn that is native to Mexico. We work directly with farmers, use a Mesoamerican cooking process called nixtamalization, we roast the corn after the nixtamalization, and a part of our corn is malted at our distillery. We then do a long 5-day fermentation, we double distilled in small copper pot stills and finally aged outdoors, really encompassing the full circle of our spirits starting and ending in the fields. 

Nixta was born out of our desire to keep innovating around Abasolo. When making Abasolo and whisky in general there is a grace period while waiting for your whisky to age where some distillers would make vodka, our master distiller Ivan Saldana wanted to do something different and completely revolutionary. We started experimenting with our corn mash, with the same cacahuazintle corn but at a younger stage in its life. Instead of using fully mature maiz we used the tender corn which we know as elote, the same corn used for esquites. It is naturally tender and sweet, and we roast half of it and the other half leave as is. We then macerate it with our unaged Abasolo for around 4 months, and then add our unfermented maiz mash that we use to make Abasolo, and the result is fantastic. Finally, we add a natural sugar in its purest form that is essential in Mexico called Piloncillo. The results are one of a kind, making it perfect for any and every cocktail occasion. They are a perfect pair, they go very well together, my favorite is a Jilo Old Fashioned, 2 oz. Abasolo Ancestral Corn Whisky, .5 oz. Nixta Licor de Elote, and a couple dashes of bitters. 

Cesar 2How is Abasolo created? 

It all starts with our farmers; they are the soul and spirit of our whisky and we could not be here without them. Juan Carlos Carmona and his family plant our cacahuazintle corn in late February and harvest towards the end of October. Once harvested, every single cob is inspected and hand cut gathering all our kernels that we eventually use for our spirit. Once the corn is perfectly dried it arrives at Destileria y Bodega Abasolo. We then take the corn and nixtamalize it, after we carefully roast the corn giving it another element of aroma and flavor. We also malt part of that corn making this whisky 100% corn. After that we mill the corn into a fine flour and add hot water and add yeast. This process takes around 5 days and once we have a fully fermented mash, we have a content of 10% – 12% ABV “corn beer” We then distill in our copper pot stills and it comes out at 40%ABV, and it is delicious! In order to get more out of our barrels, we need higher proof, so we do a slower second distillation resulting in a “white dog” of about 62.5% ABV. We then add that into our previously used American oak barrels and some new barrels and aged outdoors in the beautiful hills of Jilotepec. 

How is this process different from other whiskey making? 

We have taken the process of whisky making and have sort of flipped it on its head. Our main focus is on our raw ingredient – we care deeply about our corn, trying not to alternate the raw material, but to expose its unique, delicate flavor. We use nixtamalization, which has never been done before in any spirit or category, a long fermentation that is not normally done in whisky. and we open air age. Most whisky is usually aged in temperature-controlled warehouses or basements to control angels’ share. We age outdoors in the high hills of Jilotepec to give Abasolo a sense of place or what we think of terroir, really following our path of it being “Alma de la Tierra” Soul of the Earth

Screen Shot 2021 06 05 at 11.26.35 AMDo you think that because it is a small distillery, it brings the consistency of the flavor, or do you think that it might have a slight difference? 

We have a road map of where we want to go, and it is very consistent but the beauty in doing a craft spirit with a small production is the beauty that every batch can vary slightly. That is why people love agave spirits because depending on the batch there are slight aromas and flavors that are distinct to that specific lot. The other day, I was tasting a batch and I got a little more chamomile and roasted corn than the previous batch.  

What are your recommendations for drinking Abasolo? How would you drink it for the full experience? 

I personally love Abasolo neat or what I like to call “Abasolo Solo”, but it is such a beautiful, complex, yet wonderfully balanced whisky that can be served with a large cube and is so versatile in cocktails. It can do all the whisky cocktails, like Old Fashioneds and Boulevardiers, but because of it’s delicate flavor and the fact that it’s not over-oaked, it works well in cocktails where you’d normally use rum, agave, cachaca, and more. Lots of bartenders are thinking outside of the box and creating wonderful cocktails that may not necessarily use whisky originally, mixing it with tiki and agave cocktails. 

Is this a product that you can also pair with cigars?

Yes, we have had several cigar lovers tell us how well it pairs with cigars, it complements the cigar, the honey, leather, and earthy tones pair wonderfully with tobacco. 

As a brand ambassador, what is the role you like the most? 

I love education. I get nerdy. Knowledge is power. It sounds cliché, but it is true. I love sharing knowledge, sharing stories, and learning from all the experiences. The more I teach and educate the more I learn from all the wonderful people I get to meet. My goal, as a human being and as a National Ambassador representing Abasolo and Nixta, is to empower and inspire other people that may be interested in this industry to say, “I can do this!” or “I want to work for a Mexican company!” Out of all the things that this role requires, my favorite is hosting and doing pop ups. It is my Mexican hospitality. At the end of the day, I am a bartender. I love doing pops, you get to meet a lot of people across brands and networks. Doing distillery tours or when I take someone to Mexico is so rewarding. I love showing people the vast beauty that my beautiful country has to offer.

What are your other hobbies? 

I’m a musician. They kind of coincide music, food, cocktails, drinks. For me, that is what excites me. That is what I live for!

How do we follow your journey? 

IG: @saysar 

Website: https://www.abasolowhisky.com

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Last Monday May  24th, BACARDI honored Miami’s trailblazers and culture movers with Premium cocktails & delicious food pairings.

An evening to celebrate creatives, philanthropists, tech titans, business and community leaders who are blazing a trail in respective industries and making the world a better place through the work that they are committed to doing.

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Hotel Nacional

Hosted by Master of Rum David Cid and Janet Benitez, guests were welcome with a refreshing “Hotel Nacional” cocktail ( Bacardi Reserva Ocho Rum, Pineapple juice, Lime juice, Simple Syrup, Apricot Liqueur)  and invited to the table for a pairing dinner and the Red Rooster restaurant in Overtown, featuring aged rum Bacardi Reserva 8 and Bacardi Reserva 10 cocktails. The second Cocktail was the “Old Cuban” (Bacardi Reserva Ocho Rum, Martini & Rossi Prosecco, Sugar Syrup, Lime Juice, Dashes bitters) paired with Chef Marcus Samuelson famous dishes such as the devil eggs, Marcus cornbread, fried yardbird, shrimp & grits, grilled Yellowtail Snapper and finished with I’m in love with cocoa, a chocolate feast dessert paired with the “Cane collective Ocho old Fashioned” cocktail. 

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Cane Collective Ocho Old Fashioned

David educated all patrons about aged rums with a tasting of Bacardi Reserva 8 and Bacardi Reserva 10 between meals. As the night ended, the guests were greeted with a beautiful gift that included a wooden box with a bottle of Bacardi Reserva Ocho Rum, a bottle of Cane collective Sweet Potato On Syrup  to make your own Old Fashion and a cigar to pair with.

Images by @Nickjustchill

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